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i know karate, voodoo, too
i'm ready for my close up mr demille
soopageek
Location: Taylorsville, KY

With my big week winding down, I finally have had some time to reflect, write, and dig through photos.  I had intended on writing more when I got here to my brother's house, but Kentucky is playing... so, ya know.

Seeing Slint at the Roxy with mandy_moon was loads of fun, for me anyway.  I probably wasn't much fun to be with as I was in my Slint-trance.  That was the fourth show of five, and I'm still enthralled.  I can't believe this Saturday is the last of them.  I got some video of the Roxy show in Boston.  Where we were in the balcony didn't afford me the opportunity to take any decent photos and the stage lighting was awful, so instead, I decided to use the inadequate space on my camera's memory card to capture some video w/ sound of the "I miss you!" portion at the close of "Good Morning, Captain".  I may get around to putting it online at some point. I'm negotiating the borrowing of a video camera for the final show.  With my luck getting a camera into the venues, it'd be pretty cool if I could do a complete video capture of what will likely be the last Slint show in history.

Speaking of the "I miss you!" bit... In a conversation on Wednesday, whilst devouring the best sandwich in the world with mandy_moon, she mentioned a Magnetic Fields song which closes in a particular way and how when she had seen them live there was a palpable sense of expectation from the audience for that precise moment in the song.  I likened it to the "I miss you!" portion of "Good Morning, Captain" for Slint fans (myself included) at these shows I've been attending.  She admitted to having been waiting for that moment at the show on Sunday as well.  The conversation progressed into thinking about other songs where a particular moment in the song is anticipated, whether listening to a recording or at a live performance.  I suggested that David Bowie tune with the "Awwww wham bam, thank you ma'am!" part and she countered with the headbanging part of Queen's "Bohemian Rhapsody" forever immortalized in the Gremlin of Wayne's World.  We made some other suggestions, though not quite as good.  I:  Steve Miller Band's  "some people call me Maurice" with the subsequent whistle in "The Joker", she: the "as we wind on down the road" ending of "Stairway To Heaven."  Maybe the heavy-breathing/panting part of "Let's Go Crazy" by Prince.  I've continued thinking on this topic, some.  Here's some others (some maybe not widely known) that I have considered.  Please feel free to comment or add to this list.

-the blood curdling scream in Tragic Mulatto's cover of LedZep's "Whole Lotta Love" (yeah, this is the not widely known one)
-"You know where you are? You're in the jungle, baby! You're gonna die!" - G'N'R's "Welcome to the Jungle"
-the spelling-bee section of Aretha Franklin's "Respect"
-the "Darkness! Imprisoning me! All that I see! Absolute horror!" section of Metllica's "One"
-the chorus of "YMCA" by the Village People (c'mon, you know you all at one time or another have at least ironically done the hand motions)
-probably only delicarose will concur with me on this one: the "I know who you are! You're dead meat motherfucker! You don't try and rape a goddess!" part of Babes in Toyland's "Bluebell".
-the "Say, baby" parts of "Tommy the Cat" by Primus (a little factoid: Tom Waits did Tommy's soliloquy in that song)
- speaking of Mr. Waits, the "I look good without a shirt!" lines from his "Goin' Out West"
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Velvet Underground song Heroin - "It's my wife and it's my life". Anyway that was the first one that came to mind without giving it too much thought. Why do you like Slint so much? I've never heard them.

Aside from making what is arguably one of the most important and influential albums in the past 15 years? ;-)

But don't take my word for it. Steve Albini, who produced Slint's first record Tweez, and has also produced records for the Pixies, Nirvana, PJ Harvey, and countless others, wrote this article for Melody Maker in 1991, the year Spiderland (which he didn't produce, Brian Paulson did) was released.

What songs by them should I download?

they're not so much a song band. but buy spiderland. listen to it start to finish until you understand. it shouldn't take long.

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That's awesome! And maybe just a little creepy... the Church of Bob? Actually, after writing that above, I've been wondering if a chorus should count... ? Like "YMCA" or "How Does It Feel?"... I think maybe I went too far in considering YMCA, because it is a repetitive part of the song, rather than a specific part....

When I saw Billy Joel many, many years ago, there was a similar feeling during the chorus of "Piano Man"...

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