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this is a man's world, but it would be nothing... nothing without a woman or a girl
dave-splits
soopageek
Can anyone tell me why, in public restrooms, there is always one urinal which is lower than all the others? And I don't mean why as in, the REASON why: I've always assumed it's related to some ADA requirement or just a courtesy for children. My question is, why is it the ONLY one? Why not just make them all that height?


I recently watched the sequel to Boondock Saints. While it wasn't nearly as entertaining as the first one, there is a dream sequence near the end with a speech of sorts with which I completely and totally identify. I thought I'd share it, somewhat paraphrased since multiple characters speak the sentiment in the scene.

Men build things, then we die. It's in our fucking DNA! THAT'S WHAT WE DO! And when it all falls down? We build it right back up again. But this time bigger. BETTER! Look! Look what we can do. Look how fuckin' beautiful we are. You think the men that built all this had it easy? Hard men! Doing hard shit! And that gives me a hard on.

I am so sick of all of this self-help, twelve-step, leftover hippie generation bullshit! Now they don't want you to do anything, right? Just sit there. Don't drink. Don't smoke. Don't drive fast. Kiss my ass! Fuck it! Do it all I say! Do you think Duke Wayne spent all of his time talking about his feelings with a fuckin' therapist? There's no fucking way he did! John Wayne died with five pounds of undigested red meat in his ass. Now that's a man!

Real men hide their feelings. Why? Because it's none of your fuckin' business! Men do not cry. Men do not pout. Men jack you in the fuckin' jaw and say, "Thanks for comin' out."


I've always felt there was a disservice done to men by the second-wave feminist movement, that I'm not sure I can explain adequately without coming-off like some mysogynist pig. There always seemed to be an expectation that men had to change the very essence of what it meant to be a man. In a nutshell, we were expected to be more like women and the reverse of the scenario was just stupid and silly, because our way was wrong.

Don't get me wrong, I'm all for equality for all folk. The end result, a culture where women have infinitely more opportunity than they did 40 years ago, is remarkable and it might be that something this drastic was necessary to get the ball rolling. To be fair, in the "third-wave" of feminism, some of these trends which have irked me are being reversed. A large cross-section of women in our culture are discovering their masculine sides and becoming more understanding of what makes a man tick... and it's very sexy. I guess I just felt that for years, in the so-called battle of the sexes, it was incredibly lopsided. After millenia of inequality, it's not lost on me that a few decades of lopsidedness is a small price to pay. My hope is that when the dust finally settles that we meet somewhere in the middle.

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I've always felt there was a disservice done to men by the second-wave feminist movement, that I'm not sure I can explain adequately without coming-off like some mysogynist pig. There always seemed to be an expectation that men had to change the very essence of what it meant to be a man. In a nutshell, we were expected to be more like women and the reverse of the scenario was just stupid and silly, because our way was wrong.

I'm a woman, and I always kind of felt the same way, in a sense. I've never really felt attracted to these "new" men, and there are a lot of them my age right now (nearing 30). I tend to prefer old-fashioned "manly" men to these sensitive types who cry and feel hurt by everything I say and just don't know how to deal with life.

While I'm all for equality as much as the next gal, at heart I'm the type of woman who, in a sense, enjoys the notion of the 1950's pseudo-ideal - I'd be the type of wife who would want to work part-time in the morning, so that I could be home in time to make dinner and have a martini ready at the door for my husband. I like to spoil men. But unfortunately, I've run into many women who think that I'm some sort of insult to our gender because I wouldn't force my husband to do his own laundry or help with the dishes, and because the way some women treat/talk to their husbands these days makes me cringe and wonder how the hell these pushy broads found husbands in the first place.

Hopefully this makes sense. I'm running on next to no sleep, and coherent thoughts aren't readily available at the moment.

Also, I liked Boondock Saints II - not as much as the first, naturally, but I enjoyed it. Particularly that part :)

And now we have a generation of kids being raised by the the "new" men. What's interesting to me is that the shift the other way, where women are becoming more masculine, seems to be in some respects a way to fill the gap, and why I'm hoping there will be a settling in the middle eventually. Look at film and television. How many times in the past, oh 3-5 years, have you heard a female character tell a male to nut/sack/man up?

I think a man should be in touch with his feelings. But the notion of the truly "sensitive man" has largely been rejected by most women, despite it still being listed earnestly by some women as a desirable trait. In fact, I think -most- women tend to lose respect for a man who wears his heart on his sleeve all the time.

I've always assumed the lower urinal is for wheelchair users, and the others are higher for the comfort of standing people.

Well that's my assumption, too. But... we pee downward anyway. A lot of early urinals went all the way to the floor because it was simpler plumbing for it to just go straight into the sewer line, and you still see them from time to time. I imagine they started getting hung higher on the wall to reduce the floor splatter which can make the tile in a bathroom treacherous. I actually encountered some of these in an otherwise modern McDonald's a while back.

The gist of my observation is, why not just make them ALL low since we pee down anyway. I don't see that there is any more or less comfort from peeing into one that's higher, and therefore no reason to make ONE that is lower than the rest. Actually, a week or so ago I was in a restroom where all the urinals were about the height of the lowered one you see in most restrooms... and they STILL had one even lower, maybe a foot off the floor.

why not just make them ALL low

they started getting hung higher on the wall to reduce the floor splatter which can make the tile in a bathroom treacherous

You just answered your own question. This was what I meant by the euphemism of "the comfort" of standing people - the comfort of not having the cuffs of your jeans soaked in urine.

The nominal difference of the 12" between the two isn't going to really make a difference. It's still not going all the way to the floor which is what caused the floor splatter in older urinals. I mean, literally, the basin of those old urinals was recessed into the floor with a porcelain blacksplash running completely down the wall from about chest height. My guess is that over time, not only was it an issue of safety, but cost effectiveness with the introduction of PVC pipe: I'm sure an extra couple of feet of pipe to hit the sewer was cheaper than all that extra porcelain.

And besides, there appears to be no rhyme or reason to the height at which either of them are set. It's all over the place. So if there's no standard (which leads me to assume that it's probably not some ADA requirement) then why not just make them all the same, some-what lowered height?

Hmmm, all good points. Perhaps this question should be put to some kind of men's forum, where maybe someone would speak up as to why the difference benefits them (i.e. why they need a higher one, or why a higher one is more convenient).

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